Stately Renaissance Revival in Windsor Village seeks $1.8M

By Elijah Chiland

With an impressive Renaissance Revival exterior, this Windsor Village home cuts a striking figure from the curb.

Inside, after a thorough remodel, it looks quite comfortable.

The house was built in 1923, when development was booming in the freshly subdivided neighborhood. It last sold in 2006 (for $850,000), and since then, it’s received a long list of updates enumerated in the listing. They include new plumbing, restoration of the windows, a kitchen overhaul, and repairs to the tiled roof.

But plenty of original features remain—like hardwood floors, arched entryways, crown moldings, and an elegant fireplace in the living room.

To read the full article visit their website here.

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What Is Mid-Century Modern, Anyway?

By Lydia Geisel

It’s an undeniable fact that “mid-century modern” has become an essential part of our everyday design vocabulary. But what would you do if an acquaintance at a cocktail party asked you for a minute-something description of the style? Could you do it?

Despite our obvious and enduring obsession, the term “mid-century modern” (first coined by Cara Greenberg in 1983) has taken on a new life as an acceptable, design-world buzzword for anything and everything that even slightly resemble this signature, Mad Men-approved aesthetic. When it comes down to it, very few of us probably have the knowledge—or the confidence—to unpack the basics.

In search of direction (and a little more clarity), we took our most pressing questions to the experts. Ahead, interior designer and mid-century enthusiast, Jessica Hansen of Tandem Design, and Dr. Barbara Lamprecht, an architectural historian who specializes in the rehabilitation of modern buildings and the work and designs of Richard Neutra, break down the basics of the beloved style.

To read the full article visit their website here.

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Top sales: June’s priciest home sales

By Neal J. Leitereg

$11.5 million — Brentwood

Prolific Hollywood producer Jerry Bruckheimer and his wife, author Linda Bruckheimer, sold their International-style home of more than two decades for $400,000 less than the asking price. The buyer, per property records, was a trust.

The steel and concrete residence, once owned by L.A. Mayor Richard Riordan, was designed by Case Study architect Thornton Abell and completed in 1956. It features such modernist staples as clean lines, high ceilings and walls of steel-framed windows that take in leafy views.

Within more than 9,000 square feet of the interior are a skylight-topped library/study, an eat-in kitchen, and a media room. Including a separate studio/guesthouse, there are seven bedrooms, seven bathrooms and four fireplaces with massive hearths.

A swimming pool and spa, ponds, lush landscaping and mature trees make up the gated grounds.

Mike Deasy and Sara Clephane of Deasy/Penner were the listing agents.

To read the full article visit their website here.

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Light-filled Koreatown condo with two bedrooms asks $699K

By Elijah Chiland

This airy two-bedroom condo is situated in Koreatown’s elegant Miramonte Terrace.

Now seems to be the time to buy in the building—we spotted another unit in this week’s Curbed Comparisons.

Built in 1922, the Italianate complex is positioned around a central courtyard with vintage light posts and neatly trimmed hedges that frame a stone fountain. This particular unit is outfitted with hardwood floors, French doors, coved ceilings, and access to a private balcony.

The condo has 1,491 square feet of living space, with two bathrooms, a formal dining room, a well-equipped kitchen and pantry, and a walk-in closet in the master bedroom. Building amenities include a barbecue area and a common room with a vintage pool table. The unit also comes with a one-car garage and a second outdoor spot.

To read the full article visit their website here.

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July 2018 Newsletter

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