A 1958 Midcentury With Stunning L.A. Views Lists For $2.2M

By Jennifer Baum Lagdameo

On the market for the first time in 10 years, this classic midcentury home was architect Ray Kappe’s first commission.

Designed in 1958 by Los Angeles architect and SCI-Arc founder Ray Kappe, the Waymire Residence is a stunning example of classic midcentury style. With sweeping city views and much of its original character still intact, the 1,906-square-foot home can easily serve as a blank canvas for period-appropriate updates.

Now, for the first time in the last decade, the three-bedroom, two-bath property is being listed for $2,200,000. Scroll ahead for a glimpse inside, as well as a look at a few vintage photos of the house when it was built.

To read the full article visit their website here.

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Stunning, Early Ray Kappe With Incredible Views, $2.2M

By Philip Ferrato

Where: 4245 Don Alanis Place, Los Angeles
Asking: $2,200,000
What: The Waymire Residence, Ray Kappe’s first commission, built in 1958.

It’s hard to underestimate Ray Kappe’s influence on modern residential design in Southern California. He’s produced over a hundred homes, and his own, built in 1968, has become an object of worship among architecture students. He’s also a founder of SCI-ARC, one of this country’s great independent architecture (undergraduate and graduate) schools.

To read the full article visit their website here.

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Rent a 110-year-old Pasadena Craftsman for $4,500 per month

By Elijah Chiland

Here’s a leasing opportunity you don’t see every day. This very handsome Pasadena Craftsman sits right alongside the Arroyo Seco, near the newly christened John Van de Kamp Bridge, and it’s now looking for a renter.

Built in 1908, the three-bedroom home boasts hardwood floors, beamed ceilings, lovely French doors and casement windows, antique light fixtures, and a sturdy brick fireplace in the living room. Featuring 1,757 square feet of living space, it includes two bathrooms, a formal dining room, a laundry room, a living room, and a separate study.

The master bedroom opens directly out to an enclosed backyard with multiple patios and space for a garden. In front of the house is a huge porch shaded by a pergola overhead. A long driveway leads to a detached garage in the back.

To read the full article visit their website here.

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A Look at the Petersen Automotive Museum

Situated at one end of the Miracle Mile, The Petersen Automotive Museum has been preserving the history and cultural impact of cars in Los Angeles since 1994. Founded by magazine publisher Robert E. Petersen and his wife Margie, the philanthropic couple sought out a windowless space to house a collection of priceless vehicles. The museum opened originally at a former department store designed by the renowned Los Angeles architect, Welton Becket. Since the museum’s opening more than 20 years ago, the institution has undergone serious renovations. In 2015, the museum’s exterior was fully remodeled by Kohn Pedersen Fox and the interior by The Scenic Route. The lead on this massive makeover, Gene Kohn, wanted the building to communicate speed and motion while remaining immobile. The finished product features over 100 tons of stainless steel ribbons and a sleek facade that mirrors some of the most iconic cars in history. The institution is poised to continue Robert E. Petersen’s legacy as well as invigorate Los Angeles’ reputation as an architectural destination.

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Vintage Long Beach: Where a Bixby hung his shingle

By Lauren Beale

The rich architecture of the Bixby Ranch House in Long Beach is evident just walking up the gated pathway to the column-flanked leaded-glass front door. The home was built in 1890 — a year of experimentation and discovery — the same year the jukebox was invented. Soon to follow were electric kettles, escalators and shredded wheat.

Arguably one of the best-known houses in the area, the city-designated landmark was constructed for native son George H. Bixby as the 10-acre centerpiece of the Bixby ranch and real estate operations. The nearly 7,000 square feet of living space provided plenty of room for his wife and seven children. Formal gardens and farm buildings dotted the landscape.

Today, the now-subdivided site is a gated community anchored by the Bixby house. Clad in cedar, the eight-bedroom, seven-bathroom mansion is primarily an example of the Shingle style of architecture. This American genre echoes the Craftsman approach with emphasis on such materials as stone, wood and brick. More often found on the East Coast, the style is rare for Southern California.

To read the full article visit their website here.

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