Art + Architecture Q&A with Mike Deasy

By Kriss Perras & A. Rodo

Malibu Arts Journal Q&A

MAJ: What defines “Home as Art”? How do you characterize the architecture and the lifestyle?

MIKE: Architecture by itself does not necessarily define the art of a home. Nor does the lifestyle. But when architecture embodies its dwellers’ lifestyle enabling them to fulfill their aesthetic, social, environmental, and recreational goals, the result is “Home as Art.” Normally, great architecture does precisely that. But so does ordinary design, even humble shelters, when the owner infuses his lifestyle and ambitions into the space. For example, Matthew McConaughey’s Airstream trailer fits into the Malibu lifestyle as much as John Lautner’s Beyer House on Victoria Point.

MAJ: How does the market value of an architectural home compare to neighborhood averages, and how do you quantify the additional value?

MIKE: Unique design by definition is difficult to quantify because it is literally incomparable. In general, architectural homes command better pricing because it expands and enhances space beyond simple parameters. Even though stronger design will attract fewer buyers, those buyers will pay a stronger price. When we compared homes in the Quincy Jones tract of upper Brentwood, those homes, although older and somewhat smaller, generated higher prices than sales of homes outside the tract. The Quincy Jones architecture employed natural wood and glass to enhance the view and natural environment.

MAJ: Are there architects who are currently trending?

MIKE: Richard Landry, Robert Thibodeau, Marmol Radziner, David Hertz and Johnston Marklee.

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