Help Save Historic Church of the Epiphany

Located in the Lincoln Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles, the Church of the Epiphany is known as the city’s oldest sustaining Episcopal congregation. The church was originally designed in the Romanesque Revival style and later structures were added in a mix of styles, including Gothic Revival and Mission Revival. Apart from its unique architectural history, the Church of the Epiphany is known for its significance as a hub for the Chicano Civil Rights Movement during the 1960s and 70s. Key figures in this movement, such as activist Cesar Chavez, delivered speeches at the church. The church also served as a meeting place for youth leaders planning the 1968 East L.A. Chicano Student Walkouts. In 2005, the Church of the Epiphany was designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument for its important cultural legacy.

Today, the church is still a center for activism but is in need of significant repairs and renovation. The Epiphany Conservation Trust is vying to win funding for the church’s rehabilitation through the Partners in Preservation: Main Streets campaign. This year’s campaign features 20 sites across the U.S. that celebrate the importance of inclusion and diversity. The Church of the Epiphany is the only site in Southern California selected for the competition and is in need of more votes to secure funding. You can help the church raise up to $150,000 for repairs and renovation by submitting up to 5 votes per day through October 26th. Every vote counts in ensuring a future for this unique Los Angeles monument!

Click here to vote for the Church of the Epiphany now

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