Pasadena’s Restored Case Study House #10 Asks $3M

By Philip Ferrato

Where: 771 South San Rafael Avenue, Pasadena
Asking: $2,990,000
What: It could be called a member of a very exclusive club. This Case Study House by the father/son architectural team of Kemper Noland and Kemper Noland, Jr was built in 1947 under the auspices of Arts and Architecture Magazine as a way of promoting modernism in the US. Only about 27 were built (this one’s #10) and they’re prized by architecture buffs for their innovations and place in history. This home has been extensively buffed and somewhat altered– after being mistreated by previous owners– but still reflects the crisp, radical aesthetic of the day, with a multi-level structure that steps down the site and includes a pool house/studio structure.

To read the full article visit their website here.

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