With Only One Previous Set of Owners, a Pristine Eichler Home Asks $799K

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By Jenny Xie

Boasting an entry atrium, sliding glass walls, wood paneling, and iconic designs, this house is a well-preserved time capsule.

Step through the vibrant red door of this Eichler home in Granada Hills, California, and you’ll still find yourself outside. The classic one-story A-frame by the legendary real estate developer Joseph Eichler stays true to the midcentury modernist’s vision of inviting the outdoors in with a spacious atrium that serves as the entry and hub of the 5-bedroom, 2-bathroom residence. Designed by Jones & Emmons and built in 1964, this home has been meticulously kept up by the original owners, Frances and Larry. The fact that Larry, a former designer and engineer at the Douglas Aircraft Company, took pride in the home is readily evident in the building’s original details—even the built-in blender and its instruction booklet are in mint condition.

The 2,078-square-foot house is part of the Balboa Highlands, which has been designated a Historic Preservation Overlay Zone (HPOZ) due to the tireless efforts of Adriene Biondo of the Los Angeles Conservancy. This gives homeowners a potential tax break through the Mills Act. So well-preserved, the listing at 17122 Nanette Street stands as a testament to Eichler himself, who made modern architecture and quality craftsmanship accessible to tens of thousands of families starting in 1950. “These houses speak so much,” says Greg Guinto, partner at Deasy/Penner. “They stand for something.”

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